Tuesday, July 29, 2014

solipsistic-interjection:

oh annie, how do you do this to me?

milkgrrl:

Bill Murray on the Late Show through the years.

im so glad

(Source: derekzane)

Monday, July 28, 2014

I’m listening to the radio and the DJ just said “here’s your Monday Morrissey”

storyofpop:

The freakiest freak of them all was Little Richard.

“I am the beautiful Little Richard from way down in Macon, Georgia. You know Otis Redding is from there, and James Brown’s from there … I was the best-looking one so I left there first. Prettiest thing in the kitchen, yes sir!” 

Little Richard’s raw noise—pounding piano, driving rock rhythm, insane shrieks, unavoidably sexual lyrics—wasn’t easy to hum or whistle. It was hard to listen to more than a couple of his singles in succession without getting the jitters. There were virtually no tunes (check the Everly Brothers’ 1960 cover of his “Lucille,” on which their voices merge in a monotone biplane drone); it was all energy.

From Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley, out now in hardcover and ebook.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

nobodyknowsbutmeandyou:

The National // Green Gloves

"Falling out of touch with all my - friends are somewhere getting wasted - hope they’re staying glued together - I have arms for them…”

Friday, July 25, 2014

If you really wanna freak a bunch of kids out, tell them the cup song is from 1931. (It is)

dirtdustandrust:

Daniel johnston

dirtdustandrust:

Daniel johnston

storyofpop:

Bo Diddley had the beat. Take his onomatopoeic name for a start—it was so good, he used it in a dozen different song titles: “Bo Diddley,” “Diddley Daddy,” “Bo Diddley Is a Lover,” “Bo’s a Lumberjack.” He chopped up rock ’n’ roll’s square 4/4 rhythm into jagged pieces with his rectangular guitar, hired a maracas player called Jerome Green to add a counterrhythm, and rarely bothered with chord changes. Bo claimed to have come across his patented beat while trying to play Gene Autry’s “(I’ve Got Spurs That) Jingle Jangle Jingle,” though it more closely recalled the rhumba rhythm of the Andrews Sisters’ 1945 hit “Rum and Coca Cola.”

Among the future hits to feature or adapt the Bo Diddley rhythm:

Elvis Presley’s “His Latest Flame”
Them’s “Mystic Eyes”
The Who’s “Magic Bus”
The Stooges’ “1969”
David Bowie’s “Panic in Detroit”
George Michael’s “Faith”
and the Smiths’ “How Soon Is Now.”

That’s not including covers of Bo’s songs, which made up a good percentage of repertoires on the British R&B circuit in 1963 and ’64: “Mona,” “Pretty Thing,” “Road Runner,” “I’m a Man,” “Who Do You Love,” and “You Can’t Judge a Book by the Cover.”

Listen to a playlist of songs with the Bo Diddley beat.

From Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley, out now in hardcover and ebook.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

theimmortalsea:

Ain’t nobody that can sing like me

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

yeule:

david bowie aesthetic in #90A4AE

newyorker:

Since 2010, Lisa Elmaleh has followed folk musicians from Ohio to Georgia, photographing them with her nineteen-forties Century Universal 8 x 10 camera and the hundred-and-fifty-year-old tintype process. A look at the portraits: http://nyr.kr/1A6mVvE

Monday, July 21, 2014

barnacledwarship:

Billy Bragg & Wilco - Way Over Yonder In The Minor Key

I lived in a place called Okfuskee,
And I had a little girl in a holler tree.
I said, “Little girl, it’s plain to see
Ain’t nobody that can sing like me;
Ain’t nobody that can sing like me.”

She said “It’s hard for me to see
How one little boy got so ugly.”
Yes my little girly that might be,
But there ain’t nobody that can sing like me;
Ain’t nobody that can sing like me

Way over yonder in the minor key,
Way over yonder in the minor key
There ain’t nobody that can sing like me.

I need to rematch the Tree of Life

(Source: ugh)

UA-44473120-1 .